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Whose fault is it? To make an omelette, you have to break some eggs

The contact between Dovizioso, Lorenzo and Pedrosa was a racing incident: but according to some, things went differently: Here is the culprit

Whose fault is it? To make an omelette, you have to break some eggs


Concerning the incident in the 18th lap on turn 6 involving Dovizioso, Lorenzo and Pedrosa, obviously there was an outcry of everyone against everyone else. But how did it really go?

In all actuality, the dynamic was rather simple: Dovizioso tried to brake late to overtake Lorenzo and he succeeded, but went long. Lorenzo also went a bit long in order to cross the trajectory. At that point, Jorge tried to pull back inside just as Pedrosa arrived and the omelette was made.

After watching and re-watching the incident, this is what we concluded.

Dovizioso was wrong to try and overtake Lorenzo at all costs. He shouldn’t have done it, even if he was perhaps a bit faster than Jorge. He should have waited, knowing that the Spaniard was running on the soft tyre and would be forced to slow down. He created the crossing trajectories: it’s his fault.

Lorenzo was wrong. Given the results he has achieved thus far, he should have let Dovizioso pass and conduct himself as a good second rider. In fact, he should have let him by a few laps earlier and maybe even close the door a bit on Pedrosa, a rider who is always a threat in the final laps. And then, even though he was ahead and had the trajectory right of way, he slammed the door on Dani: it’s his fault.

Pedrosa was wrong: you can’t be that unlucky to always be in the right place at the wrong time. And then, being behind, he should have seen Lorenzo even if, leaned over into the right-hander and as small as he is, he probably didn’t have good enough visibility. It’s his fault.

Marquez: he shouldn’t have gone so fast, forcing his rivals to pull out all the stops to chase him down. He would have done better to stay behind all three, that way we would have enjoyed a more interesting race. What? You say that Marc had nothing to do with it? Then you didn’t read what I wrote: it is clearly his fault.

It was Zarco’s fault. He was the one who occupied fifth place all the way through. By doing that, he put pressure on those three ahead of him. Being overtaken by a Yamaha is a firing offence these days. It’s his fault. You could also look at it this way: there has to be at least one Yamaha on the podium, Ezpeleta has decided, but they couldn’t have made everyone crash all the way to Valentino. Conspiracy!

It was also Ducati’s fault: everyone knows how Claudio Domenicali, CEO in Borgo Panigale, is keeping Dovizioso on the hook, also balking on reconfirming Jorge Lorenzo at the same €25 million deal. This has created increasing agitation between his riders who race against one another and battle tooth and nail. It is clear that all of this is his fault.

In the end, however, Race Management downgraded it from attempted homicide to a ‘race incident’. But, hadn’t they said in Austin that they were going to be super strict?

OK, we hate to admit it, and you have no idea how much, but this time Race Direction is right!

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