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MotoGP, Sepang Grand Prix: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

The Beast reawakens on Sunday at Sepang, Alex Marquez enjoys Saturday, while the two litigants Bagnaia and Martin fight it out. Pecco gains a point, but above all an ally with Bastianini

MotoGP: Sepang Grand Prix: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

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The Beast reawakens on Sunday at Sepang, Alex Marquez enjoys Saturday, while the two litigants Bagnaia and Martin fight it out. Pecco gains a point, but above all an ally with Bastianini. It's a finale where everyone is under pressure, the riders and the tyres, thanks to the regulations.

The joys are all for those who are riding a Ducati, but some joy is also granted to Quartararo on his Yamaha. In Moto2, it's a big celebration for Pedro Acosta. The Spanish shark is a concentrate of happiness, at least until they start to call him 'the new Marc Marquez'.

THE GOOD – Downgraded, subdued, disintegrated: until Friday, one could have described Enea Bastianini with the words of a song by Rino Gaetano. From Saturday onwards the music changed, until the final solo in Sunday's race. The Beast awoke from his hibernation, forgot all the frustrations, injuries and silenced those who wanted him already in the second team. Good news for the fans… and for Bagnaia.

THE BAD – For every action there is a reaction, whoever writes the regulations for MotoGP should remember this. Leaving a bonus for uneven tyre pressure means you can use it strategically. Ducati took advantage of this and would have been stupid not to, but the legislator was instead... distracted.

THE UGLY – In the winter transfer market, there are no roasted chestnuts or mushrooms on the stalls, but riders. It's all the fault of Honda, which let Marc Marquez go without thinking about who would replace him. As a result, the butterfly effect sent the paddock into chaos. In the game of chairs in which someone will undoubtedly get screwed and now contracts only seem good for creating paper airplanes: it’s all part of the show, but cutting a good figure is something else.

DISAPPOINTMENT – A point lost is a small thing, but Jorge Martin prefers additions to subtractions. In Malaysia he began to understand what it means to fight for a title in MotoGP, you need talent, speed and a mathematical mind.

CONFIRMATION – It bothers him when they compare him to Marc Marquez and he is right, because he is simply Pedro Acosta. Twice world champion in just 3 years, MotoGP awaits him, and he can't wait to put himself to the test. The crown in Sepang was deserved, we'll find out what his future holds for us.


MISTAKE – I wish Aleix Espargarò would use the singular. In Sepang Aprilia’s Spanish rider succumbed to the lying position too often: 5 times (3 in the second practice session alone), the last of which was during the race. The men who replace the fairings were happy.

SURPRISE – Being first among the others is already a victory, even more so if you ride a Yamaha. Rather than nothing, a 5th place is better, but it still remains a tasteless salad for those who have teeth for many other courses. Fabio Quartararo showed that he hasn't lost an ounce of his talent, it's up to the M1 to get back up to his level.


PASS - The one on the outside by Bagnaia on Martin and not only because it was the key to getting on the podium. It was also a message to Jorge, after Pecco had failed in a similar manoeuvre in Thailand. You learn by making mistakes.

CURIOSITY – After 23 years a Dutchman returned to victory in a Grand Prix. Hans Spaan was the last one, in 125cc at Brno in 1990. Collin Vejer broke the jinx, his teammate Sasaki (who is fighting for the title) would not have minded if he had waited just a bit more.

TOLD YOU SO “It is very, very, very, very, very difficult for me to leave the VR46 team” claimed Luca Marini on Thursday. In the following days he demonstrated that the impossible does not exist.

 

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