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Moto2 concessions on their way: updates allowed for MV Agusta

NTS will also benefit from it and already at Le Mans they will be able to use the previously prohibited 2020 parts. From 2022 an additional upgrade for those who did not get on the podium in the previous two seasons

Moto2: Moto2 concessions on their way: updates allowed for MV Agusta

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Following the Covid epidemic, it had been decided to freeze Moto2 development for 2020 and 2021, with the consequence that those manufacturers further behind with development (MV Agusta and NTS) had been forced to continue racing with the 2019 bikes, as no concessions are foreseen for the intermediate class, as is the case in MotoGP.

The Grand Prix Commission, which met on 10 May, decided to change the regulation and thus allow the two manufacturers to update their bikes with 2020 parts, which had already been produced but never used. MV Agusta will therefore be able, starting from Le Mans, to use the fairing, front fender, seat and swingarm designed for 2020, while NTS will be able to use the fairing and front fender.

In addition, all manufacturers (therefore also Kalex) will be able to take advantage of 2 days of private tests in 2021, but reserved for test riders.

With a view of reducing costs, the GP Commission has confirmed that in 2022 the frame, swingarm, fairing and front fender will all be homologated parts, so manufacturers will be able to have only one evolution for each during the season. However, it will be allowed to remove material as long as this does not modify the original design. So, we are talking about interventions with the aim of improving cooling and/or increasing free space if necessary.

Speaking of 2022, those manufacturers who have not been on the podium even once in the previous two seasons will have a small concession, which will allow them to have an additional development for the front fender and fairing or for the frame and swingarm.

All the manufacturers were unanimous in requesting the possibility to carry out private tests with test riders, and the GP Commission agreed to their request.

 

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