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MotoGP, Michelin: “Le Mans always needs special attention”

The French tire dealer will have to face low temperatures and the risk of rain in its home GP: “We chose the tires taking that into consideration.”

MotoGP: Michelin: “Le Mans always needs special attention”

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The time has come for the sole supplierof MotoGP and MotoE tires, Michelin, to take part in its home race at the French Grand Prix in Le Mans. The men from Clermont-Ferrand know the French circuit well, but what things up this year was the date of this GP: October instead of May, which means low temperatures and the threat of rain.

Two key elements for the weekend that the Michelin technicians kept in mind before choosing which tires to bring. The tires will be available in the usual three compounds (soft, medium, and hard) but the rear ones will be asymmetrical, namely, a harder right side. This also applies to the wet tires, available in soft and medium options.

“Le Mans is usually one of our most demanding races. We have many people from Clermont-Ferrand and the other Michelin factories visiting us over the weekend, usually, yet this won’t happen this year due to the health protocols, but we’ll still be very busy with three races in two days,” Piero Taramasso, manager for Michelin on the racing fields, explained. Le Mans is a circuit that needs special attention, since there are a lot of slow corners and braking is challenging. The front tire has a lot of work to do, so we chose the compounds carefully, in order to adapt. We’ll also be racing in a completely different month than usual. It could be very cold in the morning but, in selecting the compounds for the weekend, we took this into account.

On the weekend, the electric motorcycles will have their last two races of the year.

The MotoE championship will end over the weekend with two races. It has been a really positive season for us. We’ve  had some good races so far, and the new tires we introduced this year are doing very well. The information we collect will help us with our road products, and we’re looking towards more environmentally friendly options,” Taramasso concluded.

 

The French tire dealer will have to face low temperatures and the threat of rain in its home GP: “We chose the tires taking that into account.”

The time has come for the sole supplier of MotoGP and MotoE tires, Michelin, to take part in its home race at the French Grand Prix in Le Mans. The men from Clermont-Ferrand know the French circuit well, but what messed things up this year was the date of this GP: October instead of May, which means low temperatures and the threat of rain.

Two key elements for the weekend that the Michelin technicians kept in mind before choosing which tires to bring. The tires will be available in the usual three compounds (soft, medium, and hard) but the rear ones will be asymmetrical, namely, a harder right side. This also applies to the wet tires, available in soft and medium options.

“Le Mans is usually one of our most demanding races. We have many people from Clermont-Ferrand and the other Michelin factories visiting us over the weekend usually, yet this won’t happen this year due to the health protocols, but we’ll still be very busy with three races in two days,” Piero Taramasso, manager for Michelin on the racing fields, explained. “Le Mans is a circuit that needs special attention, since there are a lot of slow corners and braking is challenging The front tire has a lot of work to do, so we chose the compounds carefully, in order to adapt. We’ll also be racing in a completely different month than usual. It could be very cold in the morning but, in selecting the compounds for the weekend, we took that into account.”

On the weekend, the electric motorcycles will have their last two races of the year.

“The MotoE championship will end over the weekend with two races. It has been a really positive season for us. We’ve had some good races so far, and the new tires we introduced this year are doing very well. The information we collect will help us with our road products, and we’re looking towards more environmentally friendly options,” Taramasso concluded.

 

 

Translated by Leila Myftija

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